USCMA’s 2014 Conference Invitiation

Gospel Justice: A Living Challenge for the Church in Mission

Gospel Justice: A Living Challenge for the Church in Mission

Today, Fr. Jack emailed USCMA members and friends to invited them to attend this year’s USCMA Conference Gospel Justice: A Living Challenge for the Church in Mission. Click here to learn more about the USCMA Conference in Alexandria, VA and how you can take part in the conference!

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Making God’s Love Visible

“Faces of Mission” is a bi-weekly blog series produced by the United States Catholic Mission Association highlighting our membership and all their work in and for mission. This week we feature Sr. Jan Gregorcich, SSND, a School Sister of Notre Dame who spent 12 years on mission in Guatemala. After returning to the United States, Sr. Jan continued her mission work by founding Global Partners: Running Waters, an organization whose mission is to build relationships through collaboration on water, food, and health projects in Latin America.

Making God’s Love Visible

Sr. Jan Gregorcich, SSND.  Photo credit: USCMA Staff.

Sr. Jan Gregorcich, SSND.
Photo credit: USCMA Staff.

Losing Her Heart to Guatemala
The Gospel, Sr. Jan Gregorcich, SSND says, especially John 10:10, called her to mission. Initially, she thought her calling would be to do mission work in Nicaragua where she had gone to study Spanish. Sr. Jan believed she would become one of the first School Sisters of Notre Dame to work in that country. However, it would be Guatemala that ultimately “won her heart”.

For a while Sr. Jan ministered in Raymond and Clara City, MN. During that time, the father of Sr. Karen, another member of her Notre Dame congregation, lived nearby. Since Sr. Karen was missioning in Guatemala, Sr. Jan often took it upon herself to visit Sr. Karen’s elderly father. He would greet her with an offer of apricot brandy and ask if she would like to hear the latest news he had received from his daughter. She remembers that, sitting there, listening to Sr. Karen’s letters, she “really got interested in Guatemala.” This spark of interest grew and Sr. Jan would eventually join her sisters on mission in Guatemala for 12 years.

Returning Home to Continue the Mission
Upon returning to the United States, the leadership of the SSND community presented her with a wonderful opportunity. They asked her to find a way to continue being involved with mission work here, as well as to do reverse mission. This invitation by her religious community meshed well with Sr. Jan’s existing desire to find a formal program in order to bring others to Guatemala and show them the country’s history and culture.

Dianne Henke, a woman Sr. Jan had encountered while doing advocacy work in Washington, DC to protest the use of landmines, accompanied her on her first trip back to Guatemala. It was Jubilee Year, a time for giving back, and Dianne wanted to give back both locally and globally. “Globally, she wanted to do something for Guatemala,” Sr. Jan remembers, “because she always heard me talking about Guatemala.” However, Dianne did not yet know what she could or should do for the people. Sr. Jan told her to come to Guatemala and see for herself what the needs were. So this stay-at-home mother of three children traveled to Guatemala “and had such a conversion she is now leading solidarity groups.”

Global Partners: Running Waters collaborates on water projects in Quiche, Guatemala. Photo courtesy of Sr. Jan Gregorcich.

Global Partners: Running Waters collaborates on water projects in Quiche, Guatemala.
Photo courtesy of Sr. Jan Gregorcich.

Dianne Henke’s father-in-law had passed away the previous year leaving a small inheritance and she was unsure what to do with it. Her trip to Guatemala with Sr. Jan helped Dianne realize that a good use of her money would be to help fund a water project for the people of Guatemala. She donated the inheritance to Sr. Jan’s community, the School Sisters of Notre Dame, for such a project. Sr. Jan and her community leadership decided to form their own nonprofit organization to carry out the water project. That was the beginning of Global Partners: Running Waters.

The goal of Global Partners: Running Waters, Sr. Jan explains, “is to build relationships between North and South through collaboration on water, food, and health projects in Latin America.” She currently serves as the organization’s executive director.

Selling Raindrops
On another of Sr. Jan’s trips to Latin America was a deacon from a parish in Prairieville, LA. She remembers how he was “touched by the reality of the people, the lack of water”. Upon returning to the United States, this deacon went back to his parish and told his youth group what he had experienced on his trip. For a year and a half, that small youth group held fundraiser after fundraiser to raise money for water, raising over $10,000 for a water project in Guatemala.

 Students at Loyola Catholic Primary in Mankato, MN work on the raindrop project. Photo courtesy of Sr. Jan Gregorcich.

Students at Loyola Catholic Primary School in Mankato, MN work on the raindrop project.
Photo courtesy of Sr. Jan Gregorcich.

In this youth group there were two siblings who had a little brother named Teddy. Teddy was too young to be in the youth group, but he also really wanted to raise money for a water project. Teddy pestered his father nonstop for a month until his father finally went to the school principal to see if such a water project was possible. The principal immediately agreed to let Teddy promote the project in school. “Teddy sold raindrops,” Sr. Jan says. He put a big cloud on a wall at the school and sold raindrop cutouts for a dollar. Teddy raised $1100 for water that first year and remains committed to raising money with falling raindrops.

Continuing the Collaboration
Sr. Jan believes that “mission is making God’s love visible wherever we are. So mission happens at home and abroad, wherever we are. I think it’s so needed in today’s world.” Sr. Jan continues to do mission and make God’s love visible through working with high school and university students on their service learning projects, organizing trips to Guatemala and El Salvador that are filled with the Gospel, reflection, and prayer. This is an important part of Global Partners: Running Waters, she says, and a way of exposing these youths to the peoples and cultures of Latin America and their needs. These students learn much about themselves through the experience and “it’s amazing how people move forward after this and start doing things on their own.”

Sr. Jan plans to continue her work with Global Partners: Running Waters, focusing on collaborative efforts and relationship building in order to support the many water and health projects needed in the region.

 

USCMA smallThe United States Catholic Mission Association (USCMA) is the only association of US Catholic mission-sending and mission-minded organizations and individuals. Dedicated to supporting and promoting the domestic and international mission efforts of the Church in the US, USCMA provides a forum in which people with a variety of experiences in mission can find a welcome, celebrate their faith, reflect on the signs of the times, foster leadership within mission organizations, explore emerging trends in mission, stimulate creative mission practices, and challenge one another to live lives more deeply rooted in mission spirituality.
USCMA is a membership-based organization. Our members are involved in establishing the direction of the association and supporting its life. To learn more about the United States Catholic Mission Association and to become a member, please visit us at our website www.uscatholicmission.org. Follow us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/uscatholicmission) and Twitter (@USCMA_DC).
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Remembering Brother Dennis Newton, SVD

Br-Denis-Headshot

Earlier today, USCMA was informed about the passing of one of our members, Brother Dennis Newton, SVD. He passed away on Saturday April 5th, 2014. All of us here at USCMA ask you to join us in prayer for Bro. Dennis’s family, community and friends.

Here are a few words from the Divine Word Missionaries on the passing of Bro. Dennis:

Brother Dennis, originally from Waterloo, Iowa, entered the high school seminary run by the Divine Word Missionaries in East Troy, Wisconsin, in 1966. After high school, and graduation from Divine Word College in Epworth, Iowa in 1974, Bro. Dennis worked two years in Japan. He entered the novitiate and professed first vows in 1977. He worked at the Holy Rosary Institute in Lafayette, Louisiana, for six years before professing perpetual vows as a Divine Word Missionary. Brother served for five years as Treasurer for St. Augustine Seminary in Mississippi and eleven years at Divine Word College in Iowa as Business Manager and National Vocation Director. He was also Vice-provincial of the Divine Word Chicago Province and worked as Mission Office Director at the Divine Word Missionaries Mission Center in Techny, Illinois where he tirelessly created and supported many Divine Word Missionary Projects around the world. His name will be remembered and honored by those he served in many remote Missions in almost every continent. Brother Dennis constantly fought homelessness and poverty; he changed the lives of many and inspired all who knew him.

Please keep Brother Dennis, his family and all of us here at the Mission Office in your prayers. We certainly will work to continue Brother Dennis’ vision to serve the poor and needy throughout the world.

Additional information is posted in our website: www.svdmissions.org.

Thank you for your support to our Missions. May God bless you abundantly.

Fraternally,

Fr. Robert Kelly SVD and Deacon Ivan Lazcano

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Searching for More and Finding Mission

“Faces of Mission” is a bi-weekly blog series produced by the United States Catholic Mission Association highlighting our membership and all their work in and for mission. This week we feature Janice England, Program Director at Lay Mission-Helpers. After serving as a Lay Mission-Helper in Sierra Leone for four years in her twenties, Janice is now responsible for the recruiting, formation, and support of current lay missionaries.

Searching for More and Finding Mission

Janice on mission in Sierra Leone. Photo courtesy of Janice England.

Janice on mission in Sierra Leone.
Photo courtesy of Janice England.

Discovering the Possibility of Mission
When she was 25, Janice England says she had something similar to a midlife crisis. She had thought she would be married with children by that point, and even though she had a good job, her own apartment, and was involved in her parish, she still “felt like there needed to be something more.”

By chance, on the way to speak with her parish priest regarding this crisis, Janice saw an edition of The Tidings, the Archdiocese of Los Angeles’ newspaper. On the cover that week was a picture of ten new Lay Mission-Helpers about to go on mission. Janice remembers thinking to herself that this was something she could do. “I knew I wanted to do more,” she says, “but I didn’t know mission was a possibility.” A year later she was in Sierra Leone on mission with the Lay Mission-Helpers.

Lay Mission-Helpers
The Lay Mission-Helpers were founded in 1955 by Msgr. Anthony Brouwers, the director of the Propagation of the Faith Office in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles at the time. Msgr. Brouwers went to Nigeria for the Marian Congress in 1954 and spent several months afterwards visiting different countries in Africa to discover what their needs were. He had assumed the dioceses in Africa would need money, materials to build churches, or similar things. And while they did need money, they also expressed their need for lay help with tasks that the priests and religious there were not trained for. To fill this need, Msgr. Brouwers founded Lay Mission-Helpers and the first group of missionaries was sent in 1956.

Lay Mission-Helpers serving in Cameroon. Photo courtesy of Janice England.

Lay Mission-Helpers serving in Cameroon.
Photo courtesy of Janice England.

The Lay Mission-Helpers go on mission in a professional capacity, Janice England says. They are teachers, nurses, accountants, computer technicians, and others who, while on mission, work in Catholic institutions witnessing to their faith. While Janice was on mission in Sierra Leone for four years with the Lay Mission-Helpers, she worked as the Bishop’s secretary in the Diocese of Makeni.

These lay missionaries are not tied to a specific religious community, so they are free to work wherever there is a need and with anyone who needs their services. Over their long history, the Lay Mission-Helpers have worked in 36 different countries, going at the request of bishops or religious communities. Depending on the changing needs or political situation in a given country, the Lay Mission-Helpers’ involvement or presence in that country also changes. For example, they worked in Tanzania in the 1950s and 1960s, but in the 1970s the needs of the country changed. The Lay Mission-Helpers recently returned to mission in Tanzania five years ago.

Making a Difference through Relationships
As mentioned above, when Janice was on mission in Sierra Leone, she worked as the secretary for the Bishop in the Diocese of Makeni. While there, she recognized the work she was doing was important because the bishop was new and not yet well organized, but she also thought that others were making more of an impact than she was. However, when it was time for her to leave Sierra Leone and return to the United States, Janice had a conversation with one of the diocese priests. She remembers he told her, “You know, who you were is what made the difference here. It’s not so much what you did.”

Janice says that this conversation made her realize that “it’s not just what I did, but the relationships I built with other people. They changed me and hopefully I had some influence on them.” Sometimes missionaries go into a country, she says, thinking that they are just going to change people, but then they realize they have also been evangelized and changed through the experience. Janice believes that “it was the relationships I had with people that made a difference” in her mission work.

Lay Mission-Helper Joy Newburn serving in Cameroon at the Treasure Center, a center for intellectually challenged children. Photo courtesy of Janice England.

Lay Mission-Helper Joy Newburn serving in Cameroon at the Treasure Center, a center for intellectually challenged children.
Photo courtesy of Janice England.

Mission Today
Janice sees a variety of reasons for the continued importance of mission in today’s world. She believes it shows the people of the world that “we are a global Church, a universal Church”. When witnessing missionaries from a Church in one part of the world create a loving relationship with people from a different Church, it opens both of them to the understanding that “we do really all care about each other and everyone is important.”

She also sees the importance of mission for the missionaries themselves and for the people in the United States. Janice explains that it is essential for people in the United States to have such cross-cultural experiences. When they have that experience, they “see the world through different eyes” and will “make a difference and hopefully change minds and attitudes here.” Even if other places eventually do not need missionaries, Janice believes “we need them.”

Janice sees the mission work of the Lay Mission-Helpers as a “mutual exchange” in that “what we can bring to them as people and what we bring home after the experience is making a world of difference.” And while the context in which Lay Mission-Helpers are working is changing, there remains a constant need for the work these missionaries are doing around the world. As Program Director of Lay-Mission Helpers, Janice England continues to work and prepare lay missionaries to fill these needs.

 

USCMA smallThe United States Catholic Mission Association (USCMA) is the only association of US Catholic mission-sending and mission-minded organizations and individuals. Dedicated to supporting and promoting the domestic and international mission efforts of the Church in the US, USCMA provides a forum in which people with a variety of experiences in mission can find a welcome, celebrate their faith, reflect on the signs of the times, foster leadership within mission organizations, explore emerging trends in mission, stimulate creative mission practices, and challenge one another to live lives more deeply rooted in mission spirituality.
USCMA is a membership-based organization. Our members are involved in establishing the direction of the association and supporting its life. To learn more about the United States Catholic Mission Association and to become a member, please visit us at our website www.uscatholicmission.org. Follow us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/uscatholicmission) and Twitter (@USCMA_DC).
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Guiding Others to find the Kingdom of God

“Faces of Mission” is a bi-weekly blog series produced by the United States Catholic Mission Association highlighting our membership and all their work in and for mission. This week we feature Rev. Vincent Alexius, SVD, a Divine Word Missionary ministering at St. Mary Catholic Church in Cleveland, Texas. Fr. Alexius works to understand and respond to the needs of the people, encouraging them to be missionaries themselves. 

Guiding Others to find the Kingdom of God

Fr. Alexius with parishioners at St. Mary Catholic Church in Cleveland, TX. Photo courtesy of Rev. Vincent Alexius.

Fr. Alexius with parishioners at St. Mary Catholic Church in Cleveland, TX.
Photo courtesy of Rev. Vincent Alexius.

Mission in the US
The Divine Word Missionaries make it their duty to do mission work and Rev. Vincent Alexius, SVD believes that “by the virtue of baptism, all of us are missionaries.” After being ordained ten years ago, Fr. Alexius was assigned to minister in the United States. “We work in the frontier of the mission,” he says. And in the United States that means the Divine Word Missionaries seek to help those in need, including poor and minority groups.

When first assigned to the US, Fr. Alexius worked in Louisiana with the African American population there. He recently became pastor of St. Mary Catholic Church in Cleveland, Texas in the Diocese of Beaumont. The needs are so different in this new cross-cultural placement in Texas where Fr. Alexius is focusing on the Latino and Anglo populations that make up his parish.

The Divine Word Missionaries
The Society of the Divine Word, commonly known as the Divine Word Missionaries, was founded in 1875 by St. Arnold Janssen. When he initially founded the Divine Word Missionaries, there were only a few members. But now, with 6000 members worldwide, it is one of the fastest growing religious orders.

After only seven years, St. Arnold Janssen sent his first two missionaries – Johann Baptist Anzer, SVD and Joseph Freinademetz, SVD – out to China. Ultimately, Johann Baptist Anzer was named a bishop and Joseph Freinademetz was declared a saint in 2006. By the time St. Arnold Janssen passed away in 1909, he had sent Divine Word Missionaries to fourteen countries on five continents.

Now Divine Word Missionaries work all over the world. Their primary mission, Fr. Alexius says, “is working in places where the Gospel has not been heard” or “not sufficiently heard.”

First Communion celebration at St. Mary Catholic Church. Photo courtesy of Rev. Vincent Alexius.

First Communion celebration at St. Mary Catholic Church.
Photo courtesy of Rev. Vincent Alexius.

A Guide for Others
When Fr. Alexius first came to St. Mary’s in Texas, he wanted to be able to see and hear the needs of the people he would be ministering to. So Fr. Alexius made a point of visiting with families and also with the students in religious education classes. He heard many questions from the students, such as “Does God really love us? Are we going to heaven? Is it hard for God to forgive our sins? What happens after we die?” From the families, especially those dealing with disability or other issues, Fr. Alexius would often hear “Why me? Why?”

In these situations, Fr. Alexius would tell them “God loves you. God loves you and he’s there always for you. Just trust him.”  He focuses on helping people in his parish see goodness and God’s gifts, working to “always bring hope to them, especially young people and encourage them to be missionaries themselves.” His experiences with people in different situations and with different needs have shown Fr. Alexius that the US needs mission.

In a world where people get conflicting messages between a loving, giving God and some realities that are not easy to understand, Fr. Alexius works constantly to guide those in his care to find their mission and purpose in life. “Because, like Jesus says, ‘The Kingdom of God is already in you.’  It’s already there.” Fr. Alexius sees it as his duty as a missionary to help people find it themselves.

Fr. Alexius visits with a family of parishioners. Photo courtesy of Rev. Vincent Alexius.

Fr. Alexius visits with a family of parishioners.
Photo courtesy of Rev. Vincent Alexius.

Seeking Holiness Always
Thinking about the future, Fr. Alexius says, “I hope that I can be a good missionary. I hope I can seek holiness always. I hope I can better myself and be the best version of myself that God wants me to be.” He acknowledges, though, that it is a struggle and not easy. That is why Fr. Alexius believes it is important to maintain a prayer life and a relationship with God so he will be able to help others walk with him and help them to be holy. He continues to strive to help those entrusted to his care to walk on the right path and “that’s what I think mission is to me.”

 

USCMA smallThe United States Catholic Mission Association (USCMA) is the only association of US Catholic mission-sending and mission-minded organizations and individuals. Dedicated to supporting and promoting the domestic and international mission efforts of the Church in the US, USCMA provides a forum in which people with a variety of experiences in mission can find a welcome, celebrate their faith, reflect on the signs of the times, foster leadership within mission organizations, explore emerging trends in mission, stimulate creative mission practices, and challenge one another to live lives more deeply rooted in mission spirituality.
USCMA is a membership-based organization. Our members are involved in establishing the direction of the association and supporting its life. To learn more about the United States Catholic Mission Association and to become a member, please visit us at our website www.uscatholicmission.org. Follow us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/uscatholicmission) and Twitter (@USCMA_DC).
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USCMA Gets a Jump on Spring by Releasing Its New Website

The United States Catholic Mission Association (USCMA) went live with a new website today. Fr. John R. Nuelle, MS, USCMA Executive Director, said, “in preparing for the annual conference in 2013, USCMA staff recognized that, like so many other organizations, an audit of our own use of the Internet was imperative. The gradual introduction of new platforms, materials, and links over the years caused a proliferation of pages, duplications, and broken links, while outdated information remained available. As a result, the website had become unruly and less than user-friendly. A re-design was in order.” Encouraged by the success of the 2013 Mission Conference, Social Media: A New Language For Mission, the USCMA staff began working on the new website in collaboration with eCatholic Websites. A complete comprehensive review was performed, and the new website is now operative.

The USCMA staff spent several hours rewriting information on the USCMA website and has created a more user-friendly interface. Fr. Nuelle commented on the process, saying, “we rolled up our sleeves and got to work, a collaborative work that rested solidly on Stephen’s shoulders.” The new website is streamlined and includes several updated features: an improved calendar with events from USCMA and member organizations; an enlarged Member’s section (Member Resources Portal); social media widgets; a new section on Mission Education; and a mobile friendly version for the missioner-on-the-go. USCMA will gradually release additional resources, especially in the Member Resources Portal, both for and from USCMA members.

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Living a Life of Mission at Home

“Faces of Mission” is a bi-weekly blog series produced by the United States Catholic Mission Association highlighting our membership and all their work in and for mission. This week we feature Deacon Thomas (Tom) Berna, a deacon at St. Stephen Catholic Church in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Through his varied ministries, Deacon Tom is committed to reaching out and sharing the Good News with people of all faiths and of no particular faith.

Living a Life of Mission at Home

Deacon Tom prepares food for delivery at Fishes and Loaves Cooperative Ministries. Photo courtesy of Deacon Tom Berna.

Deacon Tom prepares food for delivery at Fishes and Loaves Cooperative Ministries.
Photo courtesy of Deacon Tom Berna.

Thomas (Tom) Berna is a deacon at St. Stephen Catholic Church, a parish in the Hazelwood neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In addition to his ministry in the parish, Deacon Tom has long been involved in prison ministry and was certified last year as a Global Fellow for Catholic Relief Services.

Committing to Witness
While Deacon Tom was born and raised Catholic, he truly recommitted himself to his faith when he was 25. Initially, he hoped that God would not call him to Witness because he thought of Witnessing as proselytizing and did not want to be “beating anybody over the head with a Bible.” But over time, he came to realize that Witness is “really what we’re all called to do.  It’s the essence of sharing the Gospel with people.”  Deacon Tom now understands Witness as sharing the Good News with others through the way we live and encourage people.

In his ministry, Deacon Tom is committed to being a Witness, sharing the Good News with “people of all faiths and no particular faith”. He works with and reaches out to Muslims, Christians of different denominations, and those of other or no faith, trying through example to reveal the one true God he knows. This sense of global solidarity is what calls Deacon Tom to mission. “We’re all on this little blue marble,” he says.

Fresh vegetables are separated out at Fishes and Loaves Cooperative Ministries. Photo courtesy of Deacon Tom Berna.

Fresh vegetables are separated out at Fishes and Loaves Cooperative Ministries.
Photo courtesy of Deacon Tom Berna.

Parish and Prison Mission
Deacon Tom’s mission work is primarily domestic, where he sees “the idea of home mission as being part of the universal call to share the gospel.” In the urban parish in Pittsburgh where he works, Deacon Tom is very involved with Fishes and Loaves Cooperative Ministries. Through the Fishes and Loaves Cooperative Ministries Buying Club, Deacon Tom and others in the parish are focused on reaching out to their neighbors, living the example of Jesus, and working to bring food into the community. They negotiate with vendors to get good, reasonably priced food and distribute it twice a month. Most of those served by Fishes and Loaves live in subsidized housing and find it very difficult to get to a grocery store. Fishes and Loaves helps bridge this gap.

In addition to his parish work, for the past 10 years, Deacon Tom has been involved in prison ministry. He remembers one specific day in the prison that truly showed him that the ministry he was doing is mission. In the process of beginning a new small group at the prison, Deacon Tom was explaining to the prisoners some basic information about the group’s confidentiality. In response, one of the young prisoners immediately said to him, “Deacon Tom, do you know where you’re at? Do you really know where you’re at?” Deacon Tom hadn’t even thought about the differences there would be in the prison world in terms of group confidentiality.

That evening, Deacon Tom went home and reflected on the incident with that young man at the prison. He said to his son, who was getting ready to go to New Orleans for a mission project at the time, “You know, I think the work I’m doing is also mission territory because it’s foreign. They’ve got their own language and their surroundings are different.”  So in his prison mission, Deacon Tom works to share God’s love and light to people of all faiths and no particular faiths.

Seeing the Importance of Mission
Deacon Tom’s call to mission is constantly reaffirmed and strengthened in a variety of ways, including during a trip last summer to Peru with his wife. For three years, Deacon Tom’s wife has worked as a Fair Trade Ambassador for Catholic Relief Services, but the two of them had never had a chance to meet any of the coffee and cacao farmers they have been so committed to. However, this past summer  the two of them were given an opportunity through Dean’s Beans, an organic and fair trade coffee producer, to spend a week in Peru meeting with farmers.

St. Stephen Catholic Church where Tom ministers as a deacon. Photo courtesy of Deacon Tom Berna.

St. Stephen Catholic Church where Tom ministers as a deacon.
Photo courtesy of Deacon Tom Berna.

During that visit, Deacon Tom was able to speak with the coffee farmers and saw their situation. He asked one of the farmers if he had any message to the people of the United States, to which the farmer replied, “Tell the people in the United States that there are good people here and we want the same thing for our children that you want for your children.” This statement really stuck with Deacon Tom. He remembers it as “a moment to connect with a person of a different language, a different country. I could see how hard the people were working and how little they had in a material sense. So if there was any way I could help to affirm them where they’re at, love them where they’re at, I see that as part of mission work.”

Looking to the Future
Moving forward, Deacon Tom plans to continue both his parish and prison ministries. He is also especially excited about being a Global Fellow for Catholic Relief Services. What excites him most is the opportunity to go out and tell people about the important work already being done through Catholic Relief Services. Deacon Tom wants to encourage people to take that mission work seriously and “see it as part of the universal call to discipleship.”

 

USCMA smallThe United States Catholic Mission Association (USCMA) is the only association of US Catholic mission-sending and mission-minded organizations and individuals. Dedicated to supporting and promoting the domestic and international mission efforts of the Church in the US, USCMA provides a forum in which people with a variety of experiences in mission can find a welcome, celebrate their faith, reflect on the signs of the times, foster leadership within mission organizations, explore emerging trends in mission, stimulate creative mission practices, and challenge one another to live lives more deeply rooted in mission spirituality.
USCMA is a membership-based organization. Our members are involved in establishing the direction of the association and supporting its life. To learn more about the United States Catholic Mission Association and to become a member, please visit us at our website www.uscatholicmission.org. Follow us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/uscatholicmission) and Twitter (@USCMA_DC).
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